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Employability Skills for Health and Social Care

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Introduction

A set of skill, attributes and knowledge that the labour market need to possess ensures the capability of employment. This debate of employability skill is raging for some time and requires an attention. Accessibility of tools, methods and objectives to avail the right skills is mandatory to cater the national requirement in the global economy. In this assignment, the development of a set of plans, performances and objectives are likely responsible for building personal responsibilities.

On an understanding, the effective strategies on time management can be helpful in acquiring the legal guidance. The developmental issues will create a positive outcome that provides a beneficial impact on the achieving shared goals. The improved advices through the assignment can help in assisting an employer to display the skill in the current program.

However, in cases like David that assists on knowing the exact behaviourism required for employers with learning disability. The assistance of Workable NI Programme provided by mencap is allowing proving the capabilities of disabled workers.

Task 1: Essay

AC 1.1

Developing set of performance Objectives and personal responsibilities

Developing ability within disabled workers is an act of skill and confidence. An able emerging of this process is through understanding the ability of learning within the working people. On reviewing basic capabilities, a regulated set of performing objectives and personal responsibilities guided with employment rights and ethics. Thus, setting few performance objectives can be helpful in acquiring better objectives in performance.

Personal responsibility is one agenda that is a necessitated approach from workers end. In accordance to Brewer et al. personal responsibilities also set in with an initiation taken from personal end to complete the training. An improved skill in promoting strength, showing reflection to understand the stability of the work and showing interests in understanding the work can be helpful. David, a 36-year-old person with learning disability is working with Centra Supermarket under Disability Action of Workable NI programme. This program highlights on providing employment to disabled people after they pass an interview. However, prior to this, they are provided with adequate training to be comfortable in the interview. Personal Relationship in this case becomes important to qualify the interview. A set of concrete behaviour allows the person to build in a regulation within oneself and provides a direct adaptability to the situation.

Direct and indirect adaptability and relationships is built with set of behaviour that is within the working person. An ability to accept the flaws and allow improving the work role can be eminent in building an adequate relationship. In the view of Helyer and Lee monitoring, evaluating and and also moving with the set of rules provided in the training can allow the performer to establish adequate relationship. In consideration to the case, David requires to build in an adaptability with the environment of work. Apart from this, David also needs to allocate a judgemental data provided during the training procedures. Random adoption of views may not be ethical to the employment skills.

Skills and Decision making process as per David was certainly based on the present scenario in the workplace. The administration on knowing the fact that David is a candidate of learning disability needs to provide adequate time. In fact, precisely in respect to the case of David, the organisation was exceptionally impressed. In regard to Jansson  et al. (2015 p. 128), the time provided to these disabled candidates allows them to decide within their conscious and recollect appropriate answers for the interview.

AC 1.3 

Recommendations of improvement in relation to the case study

Modern researchers have suggested that handling disabled candidates can be innovative as there are variant modes of interacting with them. As per the Equality Commission, there is a need to adopt ways to treat the disabled equally. In fact, through ways like:

Individual appraisal system is particularly a boost to the performance they are expected with. The training needs suggest highlighting in one of this specific identity. In respect to Kamerāde and Paine (2014 p.261), confidence within a person can raise and innovate respective aim during interviews. Interactions through such appraisals can help in providing motivational therapies that allows a person to increase definite strength about personnel work agendas.

Communicational level is another respective agenda that helps in improving spirit within a person suffering from disability. Communication levels can be of different types. In respective training, personnel data and understanding needs to come out from employees. Guidance and support provided to David by Disability Action can be proactive in achieving requirements of interviews. These allow in providing a person in judging the condition and improve employability skills. According to, verbal and nonverbal communication can be used to increase self-motivational approaches within candidates.

AC 1.4

Reviewing motivational techniques for improving quality in performance

One well-known aspect, concerning Draper et al. motivation are theories that helps in accumulating the power of confidence and reciprocate it into work. Employability skill in a disabled person can be improved and grown with help of these theories. Some of them are:

Maslow’s Need Hierarchy Theory: A pioneering thought is to achieve basic requirements applicable to get motivated in a performance. This theory completes in setting a confidence within the candidate with a satisfaction for some specific needs. In this respect, psychological needs, will help in securing the ability to stress on basic requirements. A need to acquire security and safety need is to be confident about job security, health care assessments and also a need to allocate health care. A need for belongingness can be achieved through a sense of acceptance, through groups, friendships and considerations of the relationships built. Finally, the need of self-actualization is required to furnish the fulfillment or capacity within the candidate.

Thus, in case of David, on following this theory, it can achieve some respective details which will analyse and seek security to satisfy him for the job provided to him.

 

Task 2: Essay

AC 2.1

Solutions to reduce work based issues

Any workspace may have several issues in respect to new employment. In fact, in cases like new employment of disabled candidates like David, solving issues are mandatory. The need for this resolution is to build another parameter to develop a strong environment of work. Employment and Training Officers can assist the problem solving method.

Analysing problem can be an initiation to provide a resolution. Solutions get highlighted through the root causes. Therefore, researchers Guilbert et al. emphasises on allocating an appropriate method can be selective to promote regulation for any specific issues within working sphere.

Generating solutions can be only possible when there is proper analysis of a problem. On creating an administrative board of acceptance, the mandatory appropriate agenda is to choose the right solution within many.

Research changes the dimensions of solving issues in any workplace. The dimensions of dealing with a particular solution have changed. Thus, applying specific developed situation in cases like David, the working colleagues should be trained to deal with his issue. This can regulate in solving problems within the working sphere.

AC 2.2

Understanding of communication at different levels in relation to the case study

Communication is an integral part of connecting between individuals at workplace. It is important for David to develop little communication skill to avoid the misinterpretation and lack confidence in work. David also needs to develop an identity through the communications to survive within the service ambiance. In respect to Mahlke et al.  effective communication and interpersonal skill can help to improve an understanding within the working environment.

Effective Communication can be verbal and nonverbal. The use of languages, awareness about the languages can help in openness within the working community. In fact, this also reflects the responsiveness and develops a sense of understanding for the learning-disabled people. There formal and informal feedback both can be acquired to create medium of communication in team meetings.

Interpersonal skills develop personal effectiveness. ICT can be an eminent mode to emphasise on Interpersonal skills. David also creates an ability to develop the these skills through ICT  that helps him to relate to cases that are being discussed in the meeting. Time can also help in producing them with adequate adoption of skill for improving the employability skills. In accordance to Felton and Royal this is also an innovativeness to develop the assertive skill, social skills and negotiating skills within the employee.

AC 2.3

Identifying effective strategies of time management

Any organisation is built with certain regulation of factors. In fact, to ensure that highlighting basic details cannot improve the strategies in a firm. Skills, efficiencies and reliable sources are only effective when there is a stress to time management.

Time Management can help in finding the requirements of setting work objectives. As opined by Hart and Akhurst time management prioritises work with setting objectives. David is such cases, may have certain issues. Thus, it is mandatory to understand that a person with learning disability may need a separate type for working steadily and create a reliability to estimate task time. The organisation officers also cater to this issue and provides David with some time to recollect and admit to knowledge that is acquired by him.

 

Task 3: Essay

AC 3.1

Role of working together and achieving shared goals

Role of working together helps in achieving goals faster. The team can attempt to solve issues by analyzing the problems. In fact, this helps in developing of short term and long-term development projects. The flexibility that is attempted through such teamwork assists in negotiating responsibilities with working arrangements and conflicting resolutions. Researchers involving Scott et al. helps in arranging these topics under Belbin’s Team Roles. Respective specific nine roles under this category help in allowing possible leaders to achieve shared goals.

Roles required to achieve team goals involves balance of task and people within organisation. Synthesis of respective resource investigator and team worker can apply better result in shaping project with flexibility. David, a 36-year-old employee with learning disability can have an effective transition in the work under guidance of resource investigator. This theory also hints on different kind of doers like Implementer, monitor-evaluator and complete-finisher of a task.

Implementer is certainly one who starts and takes an initiative to grow a team. It is regulating to achieve ideas through such implementer (Black and Lawson 2017). Initiators can also allocate performance details of respective team goals.

Monitor-Evaluator is another managing figure that assesses teamwork and achieves shared goals. Monitoring is applicable to actualize need within an organisation. In supermarkets where David has been appointed needs ample monitoring and evaluation for aiming success at end. Evaluators are judging performance and allow regulating set of judgements that are applicable to analyse individual job.

Ultimately, Completer-Finisher is helping in completing definite tasks with a specific medium. In view of Jones et al. team is engaged in following strategies that allows to achieve shared goals. In fact, division of labor is another proposition that helps in acquiring an effective shared goal.

David can reflect through these three parameters in employment sector. Manageable role is independent to think and therefore employees with learning disabilities can get an opportunity to be more skilfully employed within a team.

Belbin’s Theory also caters to function with strength and weaknesses of a team. Imaginative and radical thoughts within a team can be effective to highlight potential and social combination of individuals.

Team conflicts are often related as a learning session and this creates an effective versatile understanding of employment within individual working environment. Patients like David get an opportunity to develop a consciousness about the employ-ability skills and characterizes personal performance in parity to achieving goals.

 

AC 3.2

Team Dynamics essentiality

Team itself is a configuration of several thoughts and working with specific aim becomes a key point of highlight. In accordance to Scholes et al precise attempt is to work with others.

Dynamics and nature of team with certain group work can evidently help in reaching respective long term and short-term goals. There is always a need to know respective purpose of team to objectify strategies of an organisation. Prevailing roles of different group members will allocate different corporate objectives that will create a sustainability of acquiring team goals.

Strategies also help in achieving respective aim for employers like David. In evident result as developed by Gill from such learning-disabled groups can help in acquiring, monitoring and increasing their level of dynamicity in definite professions.

AC 3.3

Alternative ways of completing tasks to achieve team goals

Teams are a configuration of different units. Holding to precise knowledge team building is guided by specialist roles, identification of group roles, skills, commitments on shared beliefs etc. As opined by Cronin exchange of constructive feed backs can help in coaching skills that leads to effective ethics, entice effective leadership goals and also allow set standards for improving beliefs. David in this circumstance can improve personal skills and are sorted with set directions under guidance of support helpers. Learning disability can reduce through constant innovation of allowing the suffering person to participate in such goals. A team allows providing that space for David for which he enjoys being employed again. This works like a constant motivational theory and communicator to provide that reliability of confidence within David. The organisation in training process allows to provide that consistent role and respective aim to get sorted with a notion of factors.

Tuckman’s Team Development Model allocates Forming, storming, Norming and performing within an organisation to highlight alternative ways of completing tasks. David in such cases achieves knowledge and skill about respective aim of team goals.

 

Forming:

It primarily works as basic formation procedure of any team model. This develops tasks with dependency on members. In view of Grant-Smith and McDonald it establishes expectations, goals and similarities.

Storming:

This allows expressing feelings allocates resources and controls issues that identify the processes of regulating tasks in an environment. People including David suffering from definite learning disability get an idea of work within organisation.

Norming and Performing:

These are other two categories of Tuckman’s theory defining process of performance and execution of performance. David acquires an essential assistance of gain that helps in achieving considerable and organisational constructive aim during employment.

Task 4: Report

Executive Summary

Organisational structure can differ on variant ways. In fact, the proposition of any organisation is surrounded with several problems. However, to meet these issues one has to aim in using adequate tools, methods and techniques to achieve resolution to a case. Appropriate strategies can also create a potential impact on employees.

AC 4.1

Methods and tools for achieving better solutions of problems

Problem solving methods can be many in an organisation. There is an aim to track progress and results that will benefit both the workers and the organisation. This allows to set in a principle for achieving regular set of objectives.

Definition of issue: It is definite that employees like David may not find the root cause of the problem. Thus, helping them to find out the problem can impart a sense of responsibility within them. It is primarily important to highlight that identifying root cause allows precise analysis and clarification of assessment with possible outcomes.

Critical path analysis:

Sorting out definite path to find a resolution analyses the details of observing the details. In respect to Nagarajan and McAllister specific to handle that implementation of strategy is more appropriate to provide sustainability. Path analysis is definite to provide resources for patients like David with time scale that allocates resolutions to problems.

AC 4.2

Appropriate strategy resolving definite issues

Identification of possible outcomes: Issues are always important to highlight so that an organisation find possible outcomes. It is precise that as opined by St Hill and Julie Yazici opportunities to analyse the issues and highlight on respective aim can trigger specific details about firm. Learning disabilities can also overcome with respective aim of possible outcomes. David therefore gets an opportunity to develop after being educated by the mentors.

Assessing alternative outcomes: It is an imperative way to find resolutions faster. On a faster note, the respective identities hold assertive outcomes that allow implementation of assessment through sustainability. There is an aim to regulate preciseness that creates an efficiency to evaluate potential impact through the employees. David gets a support from Disability Actions to ensure managing success at work.

 

AC 4.3

Potential impact of implementing adequate strategies

Aim to trigger an outcome is to revolutionise some certain respective problem in assistance of solutions. One of the primary potential impacts includes,

Evaluation: There is a need to highlight solutions only after there is adequate evaluation. On achieving the dictated aspects, a precise sustainability cause comes up after evaluation.

Sustainability: Any firm competing with global consideration is in requirement to provide desired outcomes (Roy et al. 2014, p.185). There are proclamations that will solve random assistance through adequate strategies. Achieving sustainability requires efficient follow up of strategies like educating the employees, taking up measures that are less harmful to the society.

Rounded information: It is definite that resolution can help in obtaining strictness that emphasises details of assessment. In assistance of Rao there is an aim to reduce difference between the staffs. It is mentioned that Disability Awareness Raising By Disability Action is activated, to educate other employees. This education is beneficial to provide equality within the administration. It enhances acting as a team that replicates to announce strategic positions of working.

Conclusion

An entire assistance of different employability skills helps in promoting the candidates to emphasise on improving present situations. Improving is recommended with some motivational techniques to meet the demand. On striking with issues in work-based attribute, solutions of reducing them and understanding importance of communications is provided for better understanding of employability skill. Disabled cases like employees with learning disabilities can have an influential assistance through professional expertise in improving their employability skills.

References

Babu, R.C., (2016). Employability skill gaps among management graduates In India. International Journal of Research in IT and Management6(11), pp.182-189.

Barnes, S.A., Green, A. and Hoyos, M., (2015). Crowdsourcing and work: individual factors and circumstances influencing employability. New Technology, Work and Employment30(1), pp.16-31.

Black, A. and Lawson, H., (2017). Purposes of education for young people with severe learning difficulties: exploring a vocational teaching resource–‘A stepping stone to…’what?. Cambridge Journal of Education47(2), pp.207-226.

Brewer, M., Flavell, H., Harris, C., Davis, M. and Bathgate, K., (2014). Ensuring health graduates’ employability in a changing world: Developing interprofessional practice capabilities using a framework to inform curricula. Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability5(1), pp.29-46.

Cronin, C., (2014). Workplace learning–a healthcare perspective. Education+ Training56(4), pp.329-342.

Draper, J., Beretta, R., Kenward, L., McDonagh, L., Messenger, J. and Rounce, J., (2014). ‘Ready to hit the ground running’: Alumni and employer accounts of a unique part-time distance learning pre-registration nurse education programme. Nurse education today34(10), pp.1305-1310.

Felton, A. and Royal, J., (2015). Skills for nursing practice: Development of clinical skills in pre-registration nurse education. Nurse education in practice15(1), pp.38-43.

Gill, M.A., (2017). Improving Health Outcomes in Trafficking Survivors through Core Skills Development in the Workplace: Experience from the Philippines. Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence2(2), p.2.

Grant-Smith, D. and McDonald, P., (2017). Planning to work for free: Building the graduate employability of planners through unpaid work. Journal of Youth Studies, pp.1-17.

Guilbert, L., Bernaud, J.L., Gouvernet, B. and Rossier, J., (2016). Employability: review and research prospects. International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance16(1), pp.69-89.

Hart, A. and Akhurst, J., (2017). Community‐Based Learning and Critical Community Psychology Practice: Conducive and Corrosive Aspects. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology27(1), pp.3-15.

Helyer, R. and Lee, D., (2014). The role of work experience in the future employability of higher education graduates. Higher Education Quarterly68(3), pp.348-372.

Jansson, I., Gunnarsson, A.B., Björklund, A., Brudin, L. and Perseius, K.I.,( 2015). Problem-based self-care groups versus cognitive behavioural therapy for persons on sick leave due to common mental disorders: A randomised controlled study. Journal of occupational rehabilitation25(1), pp.127-140.

Jones, D., McAllister, L. and Lyle, D., (2015). Stepping out of the shadows: Allied health student and academic perceptions of the impact of a service-learning experience on student’s work-readiness and employability. Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability6(1), pp.66-87.

Kamerāde, D. and Paine, A.E., (2014). Volunteering and employability: implications for policy and practice. Voluntary Sector Review5(2), pp.259-273.

Mahlke, C.I., Krämer, U.M., Becker, T. and Bock, T., (2014). Peer support in mental health services. Current opinion in psychiatry27(4), pp.276-281.

Nagarajan, S. and McAllister, L., (2015). Internationalisation of curriculum at home: Imperatives, opportunities and challenges for allied health education. Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability6(1), pp.88-99.

Rao, M.S., (2014). Enhancing employability in engineering and management students through soft skills. Industrial and Commercial Training46(1), pp.42-48.

Roy, M.J., Donaldson, C., Baker, R. and Kerr, S., (2014). The potential of social enterprise to enhance health and well-being: A model and systematic review. Social Science & Medicine123, pp.182-193.

Roy, M.J., Donaldson, C., Baker, R. and Kerr, S., (2014). The potential of social enterprise to enhance health and well-being: A model and systematic review. Social Science & Medicine123, pp.182-193.

Scholes, J., Petty, N.J., McIntosh, T., Green, A. and Flegg, M., (2017). Managing support for newly qualified practitioners: lessons learnt from one health care region in the UK. Journal of nursing management25(2), pp.102-109.

Scott, F.J., Connell, P., Thomson, L.A. and Willison, D., (2017). Empowering students by enhancing their employability skills. Journal of Further and Higher Education, pp.1-16.

St Hill, H. and Julie Yazici, H., (2014). Bridging didactic, interdisciplinary service learning and practice in health professions education: Students’ perspectives. Education+ Training56(5), pp.447-466.

Bibliography

Babu, R.C., (2016). Employability skill gaps among management graduates In India. International Journal of Research in IT and Management6(11), pp.182-189.

Barnes, S.A., Green, A. and Hoyos, M., (2015). Crowdsourcing and work: individual factors and circumstances influencing employability. New Technology, Work and Employment30(1), pp.16-31.

Black, A. and Lawson, H., (2017). Purposes of education for young people with severe learning difficulties: exploring a vocational teaching resource–‘A stepping stone to…’what?. Cambridge Journal of Education47(2), pp.207-226.

Brewer, M., Flavell, H., Harris, C., Davis, M. and Bathgate, K., (2014). Ensuring health graduates’ employability in a changing world: Developing interprofessional practice capabilities using a framework to inform curricula. Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability5(1), pp.29-46.

Cronin, C., (2014). Workplace learning–a healthcare perspective. Education+ Training56(4), pp.329-342.

Draper, J., Beretta, R., Kenward, L., McDonagh, L., Messenger, J. and Rounce, J., (2014). ‘Ready to hit the ground running’: Alumni and employer accounts of a unique part-time distance learning pre-registration nurse education programme. Nurse education today34(10), pp.1305-1310.

Felton, A. and Royal, J., (2015). Skills for nursing practice: Development of clinical skills in pre-registration nurse education. Nurse education in practice15(1), pp.38-43.

Gill, M.A., (2017). Improving Health Outcomes in Trafficking Survivors through Core Skills Development in the Workplace: Experience from the Philippines. Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence2(2), p.2.

Grant-Smith, D. and McDonald, P., (2017). Planning to work for free: Building the graduate employability of planners through unpaid work. Journal of Youth Studies, pp.1-17.

Guilbert, L., Bernaud, J.L., Gouvernet, B. and Rossier, J., (2016). Employability: review and research prospects. International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance16(1), pp.69-89.

Hart, A. and Akhurst, J., (2017). Community‐Based Learning and Critical Community Psychology Practice: Conducive and Corrosive Aspects. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology27(1), pp.3-15.

Helyer, R. and Lee, D., (2014). The role of work experience in the future employability of higher education graduates. Higher Education Quarterly68(3), pp.348-372.

Jackson, D., 2013. The contribution of work-integrated learning to undergraduate employability skill outcomes. Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 14(2), pp.99-115.

Jansson, I., Gunnarsson, A.B., Björklund, A., Brudin, L. and Perseius, K.I.,( 2015). Problem-based self-care groups versus cognitive behavioural therapy for persons on sick leave due to common mental disorders: A randomised controlled study. Journal of occupational rehabilitation25(1), pp.127-140.

Jones, D., McAllister, L. and Lyle, D., (2015). Stepping out of the shadows: Allied health student and academic perceptions of the impact of a service-learning experience on student’s work-readiness and employability. Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability6(1), pp.66-87.

Kamerāde, D. and Paine, A.E., (2014). Volunteering and employability: implications for policy and practice. Voluntary Sector Review5(2), pp.259-273.

Lindsay, C., Greve, B., Cabras, I., Ellison, N. and Kellett, S.,  (2015). Assessing the evidence base on health, employability and the labour market–lessons for activation in the UK. Social Policy & Administration, 49(2), pp.143-160.

Mahlke, C.I., Krämer, U.M., Becker, T. and Bock, T., (2014). Peer support in mental health services. Current opinion in psychiatry27(4), pp.276-281.

Nagarajan, S. and McAllister, L., (2015). Internationalisation of curriculum at home: Imperatives, opportunities and challenges for allied health education. Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability6(1), pp.88-99.

Rao, M.S., (2014). Enhancing employability in engineering and management students through soft skills. Industrial and Commercial Training46(1), pp.42-48.

Remadevi, O.T. and Kumar, R.V., (2014). Employability and employability skills-glimpses into global views and practices. International Journal of Management, IT and Engineering, 4(7), p.175.

Roy, M.J., Donaldson, C., Baker, R. and Kerr, S., (2014). The potential of social enterprise to enhance health and well-being: A model and systematic review. Social Science & Medicine123, pp.182-193.

Roy, M.J., Donaldson, C., Baker, R. and Kerr, S., (2014). The potential of social enterprise to enhance health and well-being: A model and systematic review. Social Science & Medicine123, pp.182-193.

Scholes, J., Petty, N.J., McIntosh, T., Green, A. and Flegg, M., (2017). Managing support for newly qualified practitioners: lessons learnt from one health care region in the UK. Journal of nursing management25(2), pp.102-109.

Scott, F.J., Connell, P., Thomson, L.A. and Willison, D., (2017). Empowering students by enhancing their employability skills. Journal of Further and Higher Education, pp.1-16.

St Hill, H. and Julie Yazici, H., (2014). Bridging didactic, interdisciplinary service learning and practice in health professions education: Students’ perspectives. Education+ Training56(5), pp.447-466.

 

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